Transparent fashion supply chains

Transparent Supply Chains Explained. Is This Fashion's New Norm?

Rachel founder Rethink Rebels

Hi!
I’m Rachel
You have gifts to
change the fashion 
industry into a sustainable one
and my job is to help you
using these gifts.

Read more

Transparent supply chains is the norm for responsible companies. Rethink Rebels believes transparency is the first step to transform the fashion industry because of the simple thought “If you know what’s wrong, you can change it for better”. But why, oh why, is it so darn difficult to get transparency? Let us get down to the bottom of it.

Naked transparency

Fashion’s complex global production network

Fashion. One of the most complex global production networks. Global supply chains are opaque and consumers lack information. A simple ‘made in China’ label doesn’t say much about if the garment worker has a good job making the T-Shirt, now does it? We simply don’t know. We are increasingly disconnected from the people who make our garments. Did you know that 97% of our garments are made overseas? Feels a bit like we took ‘see nothing, hear nothing’ too literally, right? And yeah, we say we. Because we all buy clothes and have a common responsibility here…

We want transparency. Bad.

There is a growing trend of global apparel companies adopting supply chain transparency. Step by step brands starting to publishing the names, addresses, and other important information about factories manufacturing their branded products. For example G-Star Raw & H&M are showing this on their website already. Check out our post about Mud Jeans and how they report on transparency here.

At the same time, consumer interest in transparency has increased. The conversations and comments of consumers on social media have a growing impact on the perception and the sustainability performance of fashion brands. For example asking your favorite brand #whomademyclothes organized by Fashion Revolution. In response more companies make traceability a part of their value proposition and communication.

Gstar factory overview

Above picture shows the factories of G-Star

 

Transparency as tool for sustainable production

Transparency is a powerful tool for sustainable production and promoting corporate accountability for garment workers’ rights in these global supply chains. Brands and manufactures are enabled to identify challenges and risks along their supply chain. Also to get a better understanding to manage opportunities and introduce more sustainable practices. Transparency makes supply chains more efficient and enables more informed business decisions. Lastly, transparency equips companies with data which they can use for external communication and show the impact of products in a credible way.

Transparency Pledge

In 2016, 9 labor and human rights organizations formed a coalition to advocate for transparency in apparel supply chains as a first step. In 2017 the transparency pledge was signed by G-Star Raw, C&A, Zeeman and Esprit. In November 2019, 8 companies joined this pledge:

Okimono, Alchemist, Marlies Dekkers, Kings of Indigo, Kuyichi, WE fashion, Schrijvens Corporate fashion and HEMA. Yay! More to follow please.

Transparency pledge signees

Goal: Creating a supply chain standard

Simply said, signees promise to make their production locations known in a place that is accessible to citizens. Brands show their factories and sub-suppliers that are needed to manufacture a garment and update this regularly. By getting companies to publish standardized, meaningful information on all CMT (Cut Make Trim) factories it’s possible to create a common minimum standard for the supply chain.  Each company that signs this pledge commits to these steps within 3 months of commitment:

  1. Full name of all authorized production units and processing facilities (processing factories include printing, embroidery, laundry, and so on)

  2. The site addresses.

  3. The parent company of the business at the site

  4. Type of products made (apparel, footwear, home textile, accessories)

  5. Worker numbers at each site (by category: less than 1000, 10001-5000, 5001-10.000, more than 10.000)

Taking it further

Overall companies are increasing visibility in the supply chain, which is good. The focus still lies mainly on the processing and garment manufacturing stages. We need to address the complete supply chain with all chains involved. Think about manufacturing including wet processing such as dying and printing but also knitting, weaving, raw material processing and production. It’s a step into the right direction. Because we believe that little achievements produce big results. We are moving into the right direction and together we are able to transform the most complex global production networks into a sustainable one. Ready for the challenge?

Check here all transparent international production locations at Open Apparel Registry: https://openapparel.org/

Ready for to dive deep? Have a look at Fashion Revolution’s ‘Fashion Transparency Index 2019’.   

Do you want to know more or do you have questions for Rachel? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or social via Facebook and Instagram.


Willa in the office GREEN

Entrepreneur Willa is dusting off boring sustainable fashion

Rachel founder Rethink Rebels

Hi!
I’m Rachel
You have gifts to
change the fashion 
industry and my job
is to help you
using them.

Read more

We have seen eachother briefly during the soaking wet Climate March in Amsterdam last March. She walked as an activists, and screamed with slogan such as “Let’s get rid of CO2!”. This is not a marketing thing that you often see. Or greenwashing. This is real. This is genuine. Willa is a fighter. She speaks about diversity, feminism and has a sustainable mindset. This woman dares to stand up for those who can’t, fights climate change, is a mother of beautiful son Eloah and oh she also runs her own company W. Green Agency; A sustainable Branding & Communication Agency. Who is this power woman? I want to know more about her and decide to meet her. This is not that easy because she is very busy, as you understand…


Willa Stoutenbeek en Rachel Cannegieter

On the morning of our appointment, she is already enjoying the sun at Coffee Bru in Amsterdam East with a latte. Fabulous as always. I quickly sit down, order a nice fresh juice and fire the first question directly at her.

Sustainability & Fashion, how did this ever start?

“Sustainability has always been present. From the age of nine I was a vegetarian and activist. The real problems started when I went to high school. I just didn’t fit in, the system I didn’t understand. I had ADHD and a high IQ, but school did not succeed.

willa stoutenbeek klein

When I was older I started working in fashion, an easy choice, because both my parents were also working in this industry. I was always the odd one, politically left-winged, with my father making the link between Vivienne Westwood and me. In 2010 I got myself a job at Spice PR, a fashion phenomenon with brands like Nike, Vogue, Bijenkorf, Bulgari, Iris van Herpen and more. This agency is one of the most known in the PR world. After a few years I decided it was time for something new and started working as marketing manager for BlueBlood, the Amsterdam jeans brand that went bankrupt at the start of the economic crisis. I lost my job because of the bankruptcy and got burned out. But in the end it came out much better.

W. Green agency office
Willa in the office GREEN

At the age of 27 I started my own sustainable branding and communication agency, now almost 10 years ago. Quite a daring step and ahead of the time. But here was really my heart “.

What do you want to achieve with W. Green Agency?

“My passion is to lift sustainable brands to a higher level. If we get this space, we can deliver something we have done for Yoni, Afriek or Ace & Tate, for example. For example, we saw that Yoni, a brand that focuses on organic tampons, could express itself much better on social media, so we tackled that. The photo below clearly shows that Yoni is much more than a tampon or simple sanitary napkin, there is really a story behind it.

Yoni organic period products

We are being approached because people think this branding, brand identity, visual identity, positioning and holistic approach are right and want that for their brand too, that’s pretty cool.

W. Green agency stands for Ethics & Aesthetics. Both the inside and the outside of a brand must fit properly. Sometimes this collaboration works better than the next. The more confidence we get from a brand, the better it can come into its own. And you know it’s not about my own ego, I do this for ‘the greater good’ because everyone has to see that sustainable brands are the best choice.

Can you tell more about Ethics & Aesthetics?

Sustainable brands focus more often on the ethics, so on the inside, but much less on the aesthetics, the outside. This is actually due to the fact that the ‘outside’ is perceived as too superficial. However, a consumer decides in a split second or they trust the brand and want to buy it or not. This choice of whether to buy the product is often made based on the outside, and then people zoom in deeper.

Ethics & Aesthetics W. Green agency

Often sustainability has something dusty and if something on the back is 100% sustainable, but has not been designed well enough on the front with aesthetics, then it is by definition not sustainable, because it is not sold. So if your brand is something for which there is no market, you are wasting resources, energy, water, etc. and then it is not sustainable by definition.

A PR agency has a showroom. What do you think about this?

“Years ago showrooms still had a good function, but that really disappeared. In addition, a showroom is simply an extra room that you have to heat and maintain for just a few visits a week and that is not really sustainable.

Moreover, I would like to add that the W.Green Agency does not have the image of a PR agency. PR is really a last layer and with our agency we go much further and deeper. We really want to help build a sustainable model and thereby make sustainable choices for the brand. This goes from office level, business model to branding and communication level. Think of the printer that you choose, the energy supplier, etc. With us it is certainly not a last “PR” layer that we throw over it, no we want lasting impact. ”

How do you combine work with a family?

“It is sometimes tough. Motherhood and W.Green Agency are both a full-time job and finding a kind of balance without sacrificing anyone is a challenge. Eloah, of course, always comes in number 1, but clients also should be given the attention they deserve. In addition, I am very critical, both in work and daily life. That is sometimes difficult for others but also for myself.

TEDx Amsterdam Willa Stoutenbeek
Willa and Eloah

For example, our son Eloah does not eat sugar, meat or fish, and I started giving vegetable snacks instead of fruit snacks. Look, if at some point he decides to eat it all, that’s fine, but I just think about everything very well and read about it. Then I make a choice, and then I stick to it and I am not easy to leave the field. If people around me think differently about this, it can be difficult for them. That is why I express myself with these 3 words Sweet Enfant Terrible. ”

What do you think about the future of the earth?

“I’m not sure. My hope is still there … “, Willa is emotional, and so am I. Fortunately, we have sunglasses on.” I hope we realize that we are now ruining the earth for future generations and that its occurrence is extremely urgent. As a consumer, you no longer have to hide behind apologies that the government or companies should just do it. But we really have to take action ourselves. ” Noticeably the combative activist comes up again.

Fashion Shouldn't cost the Earth

If you have to wait for companies or governments you will be disappointed. Only a few companies take this responsibility and the Netherlands is roughly 14th in terms of sustainability, while we are in 3rd place as the richest countries. I find that bizarre. We are now trying to “live life” for our son. As an optimist, the glass is always half full, but I hope we will make a good choice with the next election. Let us come into more contact with ourselves, know our place in the ecosystem and ensure a sustainable world. Not only do it for yourself, but also for future generations. This allows us to enjoy this world.

When I walk home I feel that I am touched and inspired. Willa, this sweet enfant terrible is a beautiful person. It is pure and real, without frills or layers. I think it’s nice that she dares to be vulnerable, honestly admits that she’s not quite there yet and that she sometimes has trouble making sustainable choices. Like me. Then I realize that during this conversation Willa has taught me that becoming more sustainable is a process and that it is great to grow step by step more and more …

Do you want to know more or do you have questions for Willa or Rachel? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or social via Facebook andInstagram.


5 Tips For A Sustainability Report People Actually Read

Rachel founder Rethink Rebels

Hi!
I’m Rachel
You have gifts to
change the fashion 
industry and my job
is to help you
using them.

Read more

Why no one is reading boring sustainability reports? Well, maybe because it’s wrapped in dense corporate documentents that no one cares to read or feel involved in? (including the sustainability professionals from within…). As Mud Jeans does everything different, they completely tackled that boringness and made this sustainability reporting a nice to read filled with rich storytelling features.  We share and highlight 5 tips derrived from their report.

Reporting on sustainability of your organization becomes more important than ever. Investors globally continue to be concerned about climate change risks and the transition to a low-carbon economy. (Read here) But also citizens and potentially customers want to feel good about the companies they buy from. (Read here) Let’s dive into Mud Jeans’ sustainability report and learn why it’s actually being read instead to end up as desk (top) filling material.

Sustainability report Mud Jeans

MUD Jeans is a Dutch jeans brand, BCorp certified, selling circular jeans with recycled and organic content. Their goal is to make 100% zero waste & recycled jeans by 2020.

1. Transparency & Traceability

The first thing what strikes us immediately is that full transparency and traceability is given, no holding back or excuses to share. For instance; they work with 3 supply chain partners only. But also it includes names and locations of factories, locations and even it’s owner names. Also for each product/process each appointed certificate is named and explained. To start the report with interesting environmental rescues, saves and figures are presented. It that shows the massive impact this business makes in a positive way.

Some highlights

WATER: As we might know already, on average about 7000 liters water per pair of jeans is used. MUD Jeans uses 1500 liters of water to produce one pair of jeans, saving 5500 liters per jeans. This amounts to nearly 300 million liters of water in the past 3 years.

CO2: On average 8% of global greenhouse gas (ghg) emissions are produced by the apparel and footwear industries. MUD jeans emits 61% less CO2 than other regular denim brands. 61%! This amounts to 700.000 kilos of CO2 avoided in the past 3 years.

Recycling: 12.000 Jeans are saved from landfill in the past three years.

MUD jeans SDGs

Within MUD jeans’ circular denim, they contribute to achieve the above mentioned SDGs

2. Aligning with Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)

In 2015 all United Nations Member States adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This agenda provides a shared blueprint for peace and prosperity for people and planet. At its core, 17 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) have been set. These are an urgent call for action by both developed and developing countries in global partnership. “Ending poverty and other deprivations must go hand-in-hand with strategies that improve health and education, reduce inequality, and spur economic growth – all while tackling climate change and working to preserve our oceans and forests”, according to the UN members.

Did you know that during the integration of these 17 goals during the COP21 in Paris, the owner of MUD jeans Bert van Son got the opportunity to share their story during COP21 at l’Université de la terre!? Being a BCorp organization, and contributing to several SDGs, MUD jeans is making sure to use their business as a force for good. SDG12 – Responsible Consumption and Production is closely aligned with Mud Jeans’ mission and vision. This goal aims that business activities are developed within a sustainable way of consuming and producing. 

For example with their award winning Lease A Jeans concept, they offer customers a sustainable way of consuming and both it’s sustainably produced. They are creating awareness about the current state of the world in particular to fashion and apparel and they share why they do things in a different way.  Sustainable fashion means long lasting, high quality products that don’t need to change every season. Therefore they set a goal to grow until they reach a production level of 500.000 jeans/year and from there on they will stabilize their growth.

3. Storytelling

Throughout the report pictures and rich stories are being told to inspire the reader. Like above mentioned Bert’s story on his mission on COP21, but also the pictures of the makers are proudly presented and explained. Or on the part of Fair Factories whereas Mr. Habib Ben Mansour, owner of Yousstex International the garment supplier, likes to say that MUD Jeans makes ‘noble products’.

Personally I love the story on a team trip to Spain: “Two years ago, in 2016, Team MUD drove to Valencia in Spain to bring our first 3.000 returned Lease A Jeans to the recycling factory. During this tour we followed the recycling process and witnessed how new denim fabrics were born.” They include some personal pictures of this trip in the report to get a good feeling of how much fun they had, how inspirational it was for them including the interns and it’s clear how much they love to do what they do. 

And that is the power of storytelling: to really inspire and talk to the hearts of the readers. Make them a part of your story and part of the journey. 

MUD Jeans I made your clothes

4. Define Bold Goals

Definately MUD jeans is not afraid to set some heavy and bold goals with a clear time frame. Like their extensive 2020 goals:

– 100% of all components of MUD jeans are designed for recycling

– All fibres used in MUD jeans are preferred fibres as stated by the textile exchange preferred fiber or material benchmark

– By 2020 we want to develop one jeans fabric which is 100% recycled. Ambitious: we know!

– For 2020, through an LCA (Life Cycle Analysis) we will map the complete consumption of water throughout the supply chain and set specific goals concerning reduction.

– We will expand our take-back scheme beyong the free-shipping zone and include more shops to increase the volume of jeans recycled.

…and many more! SMART goals have been set. Now the readers will likely follow seeing you accomplishing these goals!

5. Interact with your stakeholders

Not only does MUD jeans interact with its consumers, retailers, supply chain partners and workers, academia & NGOs (such as Ellen Mac Arthur Foundation, Circle Economy, B Lab, AMFI, Saxion, Fontys), influencers and other denim brands. As we see Bert or his colleagues always interact with their audience during a talk, showing pictures and movies. But also sharing pictures from MUD jeans groupies the love to brag with. Also there is an enormous internal interaction going on at team MUD as well. Did you know they have wednesdays and fridays company runs, drive electric and bake their own bread?

What we really loved to see is their organised webinar to go into detail about their first sustainability report. Eva Engelen, CSR manager at MUD jeans explains it future forward: “With our first sustainability report, ever, we will look at the past and the future. As a circular denim brand and BCorp, we have a big impact, of that we are sure. However, being a scale-up we have not been able to precisely measure this impact, which we will do in the near future. Modern transparency is what we live by. In this light, we are extremely proud and excited to share with you how we strive to be more sustainable and circular.” Check out this webinar! Check out MUD jeans full sustainability report here.

Questions about sustainability reporting and/or MUD jeans? Write them down in our comments below. Do you like this? Perhaps you like our previous article on Australian fashion brand Maggie Marilyn ditching plastic polybags.  Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or social via Facebook and Instagram.


Maggie Marilyn no plastic

Fashion Brand Maggie Marilyn Beats Plastic Polybags. Read here how.

Rachel founder Rethink Rebels

Hi!
I’m Rachel
You have gifts to change
the fashion industry
and my job is to help you
using them.

Read more

How do you know if ‘green’ disposable plastic products, marked bioplastic, biodegradable, or compostable are actually a good choice for planet & people? All the different terms are confusing. We need clarity. And we need it fast.

We all know that plastic is made of artificially created chemicals that don’t belong in our world. Plus they don’t mix well with nature. These plastics are a big source of pollution, in our water and food, creating toxic health hazards for communities as well as killing marine wildlife.

Plastic packaging biodegradable

The Solution To Plastic Polybags

Maggie Marilyn, a sustainable fashion brand from New Zealand uses biodegradable cassava polybags. They are made from the cassava root, vegetable oil, and vegetable polymers and are produced in Indonesia. These bags, created for them by ComPlast, decompose back to nature and dissolve in water. Maggie Marilyn explains “Some manufacturers of petroleum-based bags will add plant-based materials to the plastic and also claim these as “biodegradable”. A very frustrating piece of greenwashing!”

Currently, these bio-based polybags are commercially compostable (99.5% plant material) and they are developing towards home-composting. These bags completely biodegrade back into the environment without creating any type of microplastics (as the petroleum-based plastic do). Maggie Marilyn shares more detailed information on their website and by doing so, they hope to encourage other brands and retailers to demand more on this specific issue that is holding us back from being more accountable to our waste. Sharing = Caring!

Currently, these bio-based polybags are commercially compostable and hopefully soon for home-composting.

Maggie Marilyn ComPlast biodegradable bag from 100% natural products

Recycling bio-based plastics

The volume of bio-based plastics is still too small for separation or separate collection. But hey, isn’t this just like electric cars? At first, nobody bought one because there was no charging point. But then, nobody is going to install charging stations if there are no electric cars… Just the same case with the recycling of bio-based plastics. It’s ultimately up to waste companies to break through that problem. Overall, it is expected that by 2020 the share of bio-based and biodegradable plastics will increase to 2.5% of fossil plastics production (read here more about this). That’s only a half a year away from now…

Facilitate Consumers’ best behavior

Collection and sorting, which starts at consumers and their behavior, largely determine the (energy) efficiency of waste management systems. To facilitate consumers to choose the right route of disposal for packaging waste, pictograms can be used to indicate the preferred disposal route.

New Plastic Economy Ellen MacArthur

Six key points so that plastic never becomes waste

The New Plastics Economy (Ellen MacArthur Foundation) has defined six key points to catalyze change and shift towards a circular economy where plastic never becomes waste:

  1. Elimination of problematic or unnecessary plastic packaging through redesign, innovation, and new delivery models is a priority

  2. Reuse models are applied where relevant, reducing the need for single-use packaging

  3. All plastic packaging is 100% reusable, recyclable, or compostable

  4. All plastic packaging is reused, recycled (rPET), or composted in practice

  5. The use of plastic is fully decoupled from the consumption of finite resources

  6. All plastic packaging is free of hazardous chemicals, and the health, safety, and rights of all people involved are respected.

Questions about polybags & plastics? Write them down in our comments below. Do you like this? Perhaps you like our previous article on plastics in a circular economy.  Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or social via Facebook and Instagram.


Plastic Packaging in a circular economy

Fashion Industry: Plastic Packaging in a Circular Economy. Doing it the Right Way.

Fashion Industry: Plastic Packaging in a circular economy; doing it the right way.

The apparel and textile supply chain is tackling the issue with research and innovation, as the problem of plastic waste becomes more critical. Walmart noted that the pros to the use of plastic packaging have not kept up with increases in plastic production, which amounts roughly 500 million tons annually. About 35% of Walmart’s plastic production goes to packaging, most of which is single-use and then discarded. Did you know that less than 14% of plastic packaging is globally recycled?

Did you know that less than 14% of plastic packaging is globally recycled?

The positive environmental effects of using sustainable products are distributed throughout the chain from producers to end users. The CO2-saving effects of, for example, bio-based products are good for everyone and not just for the user. In this way, the costs and the positive environmental effects, are distributed. 

Greenwashing vs. Greenhushing

It’s time to communicate as clearly, informative and transparent as possible about the plastic packaging within a circular economy. There is so much uncertainty about this subject. Much has to do with Greenwashing (appearing more green than it actually is) or Greenhushing (doing green but afraid to communicate about it). Rethink Rebels believe transparency is key and with the right information, you can make the right decisions regarding packaging and communicate about this fairly. 

biomass sugarcane as plastic

Bio-based products are made from biomass such as sugar cane

When a product is bio-based it means that the product is made from biomass such as sugar cane or corn. The sugars are extracted from this biomass and the basic raw material ethylene can be made from this. Ethylene materials are bonded together, creating polyethylene, which is used to make plastic. Note: Ethylene materials are both made from fossil raw materials and from biomass. The end product, plastic, in this case, is identical when it is made from fossil or bio-based raw materials and there is no loss of quality.  

When a product is bio-based, you can’t just throw it into nature.

There is still a lot of uncertainty among users of bio-based products and users think that these products can be broken down in nature. But the reality is that it is a bit more complicated. Let’s look at it more in detail and inform you about the degradation possibilities of plastics.

The degradation possibilities of plastics

Plastics are either fossil or bio-based. Within these 2 groups, there are compostable and not-compostable kinds. Herewith a clear framework to shed some light on this:

Bio Based and Fossil Based plastics overview Rethink Rebels

Source: https://vendrigpackaging.com

Compostable and non-compostable fossil-based plastics

Plastic products are currently made from fossil fuels. And we all know that fossil fuels are finite and produce CO2 during the production of plastic which causes the climate to heat up. Time for innovation and time to look at better options.

A big advantage of bio-based plastics they are CO2 NEUTRAL

The big advantage of bio-based products (biomass/bioplastics) is that they have a different carbon (CO2) cycle than products made from fossil materials: during their growth cycle, they absorb CO2. Therefore these products are seen as CO2 neutral. In theory, it is, therefore, possible to make infinite biomass on earth.

Compostable vs. not compostable bio-based plastics

Bio-based plastics are also called bio-plastics. The difference here is the compostable and not compostable abilities within this group. Compostable bioplastics are either composted industrial (55-60 degrees Celsius and enzymes) or domestically composted (Green trash bin: less high degrees, time and enzymes).  The not-compostable bioplastics should be recycled within regular plastic recycling. The environmental advantage here is that the raw materials are from plants and therefore take up CO2 during their growing process (indifference to fossil-based raw materials).

The packaging industry now lacks rules about what producers should put on their packaging about recyclability.

The current recycling claims on the packaging are often theoretical and can give the wrong signal. For example, packaging made of biodegradable plastic. The consumer thinks that this packaging can be composted or recycled very well. The reality shows that recycling companies are experiencing problems with the recycling of these packaging. In the end, they almost always go into the incinerator.

Ellen Mac Arthur infographic circular economy

Source: Ellen MacArthur Foundation

Circular packaging model

New business models and innovations, using circular economy principles, are transforming traditional take-make-dispose thinking with incredible speed. The fashion industry should be part of the circular economy revolution and committed to making some breakthroughs in packaging waste.

Ideal sustainable packaging should contain

1)      1 sort material (partially made from recycled material)

2)      optimized caps and labels that don’t disturb the recycling of the other materials

3)      Transparent or light color

Source: Duurzaam bedrijfsleven

Sustainable packaging NEWS

If we act now, unnecessary plastic waste will soon be a tale to tell our grandchildren! We will regularly add more news about sustainable packaging for the fashion industry here. Do you want to be kept informed? Subscribe here to our newsletter.


Chiara Indiaan in je Kast en Rachel

The Dutch Marie Kondo, Chiara Spruit, makes your wardrobe sustainable

Ever heard of the so-called Konmari method of Marie Kondo? Netflix hero Marie Kondo is so popular that it has already become a verb. I Marie Kondo, You Marie Kondo and we all Marie Kondo. Something like that. Marie Kondo is a cleanup guru in the USA. Totally at ease she will go through your pile of clothes with and you can keep it whenever you feel a ‘spark of joy’, everything else you say ‘thank you’ and say goodbye to. But there’s more! We know Chiara Spruit in the Netherlands. 

The consumer society in which we live consists of a repeated principle of buying, storing and throwing away. It is also called take-make-waste. We secretly no longer know what we actually have and no longer cherish our things. Chiara wants to change this and does this in a very personal way.

Chiara Spruit Marie Kondo style

I meet her during a circular fashion show at CIRCL and ask her a few questions about her way of working. First of all, she tells me where her name comes from. She calls herself Indian in your closet. Indian, because she was adopted from Colombia and in your closet because that is her favorite place. 

What are your tips & tricks that make people happy about their wardrobe again? 

“The first step really starts with yourself, what kind of person you are and what suits you and what makes you happy? What are your strengths and lesser points? Then you may wonder if you are going to shop sustainably, vintage shopping, swapping, borrowing or all in a mix. In addition, I think it is important that people cherish what they have, but also realize that there is a story behind every item of clothing. A piece of clothing that you buy in the store usually has no story. I’m trying to explain to really look at a piece of clothing and find out what feeling you get from that piece; does it give you a ‘spark of joy’? Yes or no? 

For example, think of that beautiful blouse with buttons from your grandma on it, you’ll never throw something like that away. I really look at a piece of clothing and ask myself ‘how you can I make this unique’. See, a basic is a basic. But a unique piece of clothing teaches you to look at the time spent on it. Five or ten years ago they were not really talking about sustainable fashion. I already did what I did. Learning to look at details and to cherish clothes has been introduced to me as a child”.

Chiara Indiaan in je Kast en Rachel

The basis for a sustainable wardrobe is self-knowledge. Chiara barely hears this in the media (do you want to know more about this? Then read the article with Clare Press).

Together with Chiara you gradually get closer to yourself, she also calls it peeling the layers of the onion until you are really on the core. Who am I, what do I want, what do I feel comfortable with? Not your partner, your employer, your children or whatever: no, it’s about you.

What about business clothing?

 “If you work for a corporate company and you have a meeting, it is nice that you have a nice jacket and pants. But a jacket and pants are very different if you wear this with a leopard belt or banana socks. This is, of course, just an example, but try to make things your own, and like this, you don’t have to buy a different (expensive) suit every time.

Always try to change something small, then it feels that it’s like new. If you can create a wardrobe for yourself that contains clothing that suits you, what you really wear, that you have an overview, and enjoy: then that is really sustainable.

How does a wardrobe session work?

“There are various options. You can book a workshop with a group of girlfriends, but I can also visit you at home. During a wardrobe session, I work thoroughly. It’s all about you. During a wardrobe session, all layers of the onion are peeled off to get to the core. Who are you? I make many sincere compliments, identify qualities and inspire people. A wardrobe session involves taking steps. A wardrobe is an accumulation of years and expresses itself in a certain world of thought: how did you see yourself versus who you are now? Change is slow, but I do try to set change processes in motion. For information, the prices are between 79 (workshop with girlfriends) and 500 euros (private wardrobe session of a day).

How do you see sustainability yourself?

“I am a proponent of sustainability, but whether I am a world improver? I think so, but we have to do it together. I can really only improve the world if people actually pick up my story. We improve the world together. Somewhere there is a bit of a smudge on my profession. As a stylist, you are often busy disapproving. This is out of fashion, this is no longer possible, you are too old / too young / too fat / too thin, etc. This is of course not really a sustainable idea and that does not suit me.

Do you have an ultimate shop tip?

“Yes, of course! Book a session with me: Indian in your closet and turn your own closet into your favorite clothing store! I want to make sure that you will be happy again from your own store, just at home. You don’t have to search for externally, everything starts with you!

Do you want to know more or do you have questions for Rachel? Or Chiara? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or via Facebook and Instagram.


Sustainable Vogue March 2018

Fashion magazine Vogue favors sustainability. You too?

Every day we receive a large portion of negative messages from fashion brands. Advertising constantly tells us that we do not have enough of the right things, that we are not thin enough, not young, not beautiful, too old, too fat, too ugly, too poor, too unfashionable, too incomplete, or that we are completely out of fashion. We are constantly fed with the feeling of; “we just aren’t enough”.

We are constantly fed with the feeling of; “we just aren’t enough”.

Well you know, I have had enough of that in the meantime, you too? Enough of discrimination, lowering self-confidence, enough of ‘just not right’, enough of not being part of it (where actually?), enough of plastic, enough of dirty oceans and seas, enough of (having to) consume too much, but how should we do it better actually?

Clare Press, known as the first sustainable editor at Vogue Australia, comes with a positive sound to take action in a good way. She tries to inform people about sustainable fashion and how we can change that ourselves.

FashionforGood Clare Press Rethink Rebels

At the end of 2018, Clare Press was in the world’s first sustainable fashion museum, Fashion for Good in Amsterdam, for the European launch of her book “Rise & Resist, how to change the World”. 

Amsterdam is the first to choose a sustainable fashion museum; Museum Fashion for Good. 

Fashion for Good (Rokin, Amsterdam) was opened in October 2018 and offers everyone the chance to learn everything about the history of good fashion, sustainable products, and the latest fashion innovations. Stories behind the clothes that you wear are told here. In addition, it shows you how you can take action and have a positive impact on the fashion industry. This makes the city of Amsterdam the first to choose a sustainable fashion museum.

Clare Press Nimue Smit FFG Rise and Resist Rethink Rebels

Photo: Giullia Squillace

During the launch, Clare says positivity is the only way to convince people. Ultimately we all know somewhere that we are not terrible. We are intrinsically good and we really do not want to pollute the environment with our t-shirt, let alone propagate child labor or exploitation. But where do you start as a consumer? Shouldn’t the clothing brands themselves just take action? “People want sustainable solutions,” says Clare. “And this opportunity is a huge one for designers and companies.

There is more attention for sustainability on TV  Fortunately, more attention has recently been paid to sustainable fashion in programs such as “Genaaid” on NPO3 and VPRO Tegenlicht “Future Fashion Pioniers”. But how are you actually going to start? How can you tackle this problem? When I interview Clare, she says that it is useful to always choose your own passion as the starting point. Remember what you think is important.  “I really care about the environment and it’s important to me that a brand focuses on that,” Clare explains. “Everyone has their own moral compass and ideas about what is good for them or not. It’s such a big problem that people can feel overwhelmed and then lie on their backs and do nothing anymore.” According to Clare, the most important thing is to start small. Think about what motivates you the most and then you can expand that more as a consumer. Want to know more about this? Then read the following article; These are the tips for a more sustainable life. 

Actress Emma Watson also prefers sustainable fashion In addition to TV, nowadays more and more actors, celebrities and the likes are opting for sustainability. In March 2018, for example, actress Emma Watson (known from the Harry Potter series) contributed to Vogue Australia, which was all about sustainability.

Sustainable Vogue March 2018

This sustainable edition of Vogue created the new (and at the time non-existent) job of Clare Press: Sustainability Editor-at-Large Vogue. Clare says about this “I am a bit of a special case, it is not common for a journalist and fashion editor to write about sustainability. It is my job to keep the conversation about sustainability as much as possible, and to build a sustainable future, “says Clare. Of course, I could not resist asking Clare about her tips for sustainable shopping, here they are:

Clare’s tips to shop sustainable:  

  • Download the “Good on You” app for free. Super handy, fast and gives you all the (sustainable) information you want to know about your brands and clothing. In addition, it also offers alternatives when your own brand scores lower than hoped.

  • Check small, sustainable brands on Instagram. Search on hashtags (#duurzamemode or #sustainablefashion).

  • Buy locally and support good products. Do not buy less if you do not want to, but support the sustainable brands (eg The Faire East, Miss Green, Project CeCe).

  • Visit the Fashion for Good museum in Amsterdam

  • Listen to the various podcasts Wardrobe crisis of Clare

  • And of course read the book Rise & Resist

Clare Press Rise and Resist and Rachel Cannegieter

Do you want to know more or do you have questions for Rachel? Or maybe Clare Press? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or follow us via Facebook and Instagram.


Safe Money with these sustainable lifestyle tips Rethink Rebels

This saves you no less than € 10,000 a year. These are the 7 tips!

“Gosh, are you going to Disney in America again with the kids in this short May break? What a wonderful thing. Were you not just been to Cape Town, Kyoto and Tulum? No, but nice for you to say! You work hard for it too”. I sigh a moment and pick up my phone. “Honey. I’m going to book something for the May break now. It doesn’t matter where, as long as it’s tropical, and something nice. Agree?”

Looking back, I think. Serious? I am sick of this. We try to keep up with each other at a killing pace. Both partners work, we buy too much stuff, good clothing for the kids and want to make the most fun journeys, but in addition, we are exhausted, we are tired, we have monthly sessions with the psychologist who calls ‘us kind of an epidemic’ and we have a trade in sleeping pills. Honestly. What the hell went wrong with us? And when did this happen? And how are we going to change this as quickly as possible?

As if you are only someone when you drive that car, live in that house, wear (brand) clothing and can take your children to the most luxurious places every school holiday. I simply had enough of it. I wanted to starve myself to some kind of exhaustion to see if life became very different. Whether I could do it. Whether I could stand the pressure. Whether I could stay myself or whether I just got to know myself. I wanted back to basics. And suddenly it was there; a kind of resistance to this current thinking.

Seven tips for saving money

Even with my very average income, living in a more expensive area of the country, I managed to save 10,000 euros within 12 months. I did this by changing my lifestyle extremely and living under my current lifestyle. It was not easy and required a lot of hard work and sacrifices. And if I can, then you can too. I have described a formula so that you can achieve this also.

1. Become financially independent

  • Super cliché but most of the time the clichés are true. Your own job, your own income, your own worries.

  • How much do you really want this? To save 12 months you seriously have to go for it. It is not about a sprint, but about a marathon. No one else is going to do this for you, it requires sacrifice, it is difficult and you need a degree of perseverance. The right mindset is everything.

2. Check your expenses

  • Money does not cause stress, but, if you have no idea where your money is going, or afraid to check your balance? Then you have some serious stress. Super simple solution. Block 2 evenings or a weekend and arrange a good bottle of wine. Use excel to record all expenses of each month (or use a handy app for this) and you will get insight into your cash flows. Up to the euro, you can see where your money is going and whether you want to. Write down everything. Believe me, you need wine now.

  • What do you spend on food per week? including groceries, eating out, fresh coffee, snacks at the gas station etc. What do you spend on entertainment? Netflix, telephone, internet, cinema, books, music, concerts etc. And what about alcohol and cigarettes? What are the monthly bills such as rent, mortgage, energy, water/gas/ light, car, taxes, insurance, student loans, gym, shopping, clothing etc? You are probably very surprised by how much you spend. It is the small things that make the total a big boost.

  • Don’t worry be happy. It is what it is, and from now on you will do things differently. Check how much you have to save every month to get to where you want to end up. Hey, you’re not perfect and it takes time to get there. It takes time to build this kind of consciousness and to follow everything strictly. But when you see the successes, you will automatically change.

3. Go budgeting 2.0 – needs vs. wants

  • Make a budget. Start at the top with the monthly income (average).

  • Calculate all monthly income. Do not forget the income that you receive once a year/half year/quarter. It gives a good idea of what your income looks like on average per month in a year.

  • Below you start with the fixed costs, from high to low costs. For example your mortgage or rent, insurance, car, energy/water/ light etc.

  • Once you have calculated the fixed costs, check which monthly costs are important to you. Do you want to continue to pay this or do you stop certain fixed costs? For me, groceries, the hairdresser, beautician (difficult skin), clothing for my kids (mind you, nothing for myself that year round) and saving remained on the fixed expense list. In addition, I gave myself 50 euros a month in pocket money (so I also had to buy presents, date and other things together).

  • As you can see, I was very rigorous & very serious. I wanted to reach my goal of 10,000 euros at all costs. I really looked at my ‘need to have’ versus ‘want to have’. Hairdresser and beautician I actually thought was luxury but gave me the boost I needed to radiate enough confidence. Basically, everything I left after these posts went to post save
    The trick is always to make sure you know how much of your budget is left. I knew exactly what I spent and started working harder to reach my goal.

Safe Money with these sustainable lifestyle tips Rethink Rebels

4. Develop the habit of saving money

  • You could also see if you can go to work by bike. Or instead of paying expensive parking costs: park outside the center and then cycle to the center with your folding bike. I myself had a company car, so I didn’t have to save on it. But I had chosen the cheaper class in the lease range. This saved me 100-150 euros a month compared to colleagues.

  • Weekly shopping instead of doing daily shopping (on a full stomach with a shopping list). Cheaper supermarkets, check offers and go to the market in the afternoon (then everything goes away cheaper). We made all our food ourselves: breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It is quite a job but once you are in the rhythm, it works. If you cook for yourself, you can save between 5-10 euros per meal, around 120-200 euros per month. That is easy to earn and it is very nice and cozy.

  • And then about the girlfriends’ drinks. Instead of going to an expensive cafe (40-50 euros) you can convince them to meet up with someone and take something with you. They really like it and that way you will come to someone’s home again.

5. Lower your mortgage or rent

Since mortgage or rent is the largest item, it can be interesting to take a good look at this item.

  • Check with your bank/advisor whether your mortgage can be taken out for a lower interest rate. Sometimes you have to pay a fine because you break off your deadline earlier, but it can also be very interesting in the longer term. It is, therefore, a short loss for a long-term profit.

  • Take a roommate and split the costs.

  • Move to a cheaper neighborhood. Rigorous, but not impossible.

  • If you spend a weekend with friends/parents, you can rent your home through Airbnb. Sometimes look a little further than you initially envision. It seems drastic, but everything gets used. It is about realizing your goal, which you must keep in mind.

6. Sell your crap

I need cash. How do I do that?

  • By having a thorough cleaning in your house and selling everything on the marketplace. Children’s clothing, shoes, coats, furniture (they do well), books, you name it.

  • Cancel cancellation insurance and travel insurance & other subscriptions (sports, magazines, etc).

  • “Going out at home.” For example, I didn’t go out anymore, remember? We went shopping cheaper, I didn’t buy any clothes for a year … and you know, I really didn’t need it all. During the evenings with friends at home, I could immediately look inside their wardrobe and see what I could borrow. Super handy evenings!

  • Shorter showers, candles and fewer lights on, purchase LED lights

  • Comparing the energy suppliers and health costs every year. It is offered enormously and is certainly worthwhile and saved!

 

7. Find a sidekick job

Everyone wants to earn something extra.

  • See where your talents lie and respond to them! Can you play the guitar well? go teach! Are you handy? Sign up as a handyman/man. Just do it and make extra money! I did that by giving Zumba lessons and giving extra attention. Easy earnings!

  • Set yourself a viable goal with a reasonable timeline. Go for it and work on your dreams, go on that dream trip or buy that piece of art or just keep on saving and ensure a mortgage-free existence! Whatever, what you find important. You don’t have to be afraid of failing, but you have to be in exactly the same place next year as today.

For me, it has become a way of life. I no longer feel the urgency to buy things. Let me say: I don’t need it anymore. Black Friday was a non-buying day for me (just out of opposition), but I will also organize these upcoming holidays as purely as possible. I love buying presents, don’t get me wrong. But it can all be a little less and more conscious. We prefer to do something fun together, enjoy the time together. Having experiences together has become the most important thing.

Extra tips for saving money:

Books:

Stuffocation: living more with less by James Wallman

Rise and Resist by Clare Press

Netflix:

Minimalism: a documentary about the important things

The True Cost

Do you want to know more or do you have questions for us? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or via Facebook and Instagram.


Chanel Trapman sustainable lifestyle and fashion advocate

Burning New Clothes. The New Standard? Chanel doesn't think so!

In July 2017, British fashion house Burberry, known for the check print, was in the news. No, not because of their latest collection, no it was revealed that the brand had burned more than 30 million euros in clothing. Say what?  In this way, the things remained out of the hands of counterfeiters who would like to copy their items. Smart idea, but very bad for the environment. Because in the end, it turned out that 100.5 million euros had gone up in smoke over the years.

In the Netherlands, 1.2 million items of clothing are destroyed every year. The environment is therefore extremely burdened and additional man-hours are required to process the textile waste. Why is this actually happening and why is there no legislation or regulation for this yet?

Frankenhuis recycling sustainable fashion Rethink Rebels

And how can 1 in 9 children live in poverty and therefore have no money for new clothes, while new clothes are burned? Entrepreneur Chanel Trapman does not understand this and decided, together with Green Left, Suzanne Kröger, to start a petition to get a ban on burning unsold clothing. Are you done with this too? then sign the petition.

Chanel has a huge mission to make people aware that fashion needs to be more sustainable and to inform about the many initiatives that exist. Something that naturally inspires me enormously. A few weeks ago I decided to interview her at The Impact Store in Amsterdam.

Where did your passion for fair fashion arise?

About four years ago when I saw The True Cost, a documentary on Netflix, I was a mother and student, so I didn’t have much money. My son was 2 years old and I regularly went to Primark, because hey he grew up fast. Actually, very ignorantly, I bought everything for him and for me. Isn’t that just how it works?

The True Cost has done so much with me. In the documentary you see children working with mothers and so I realized that I made a subconscious contribution to their nasty living conditions through my buying behavior. In combination with seeing The True Cost and my training as a documentary maker, a lot has been triggered. I knew I had to change this. My mission to make more people aware of this what is born.

Truecost Rethink Fashion Livingwage Rethink Rebels

However, the way and way was still very searching. That’s why I spent four years looking for initiatives with my camera, interviewing people, writing a lot and helping sustainable brands with their communication to the outside world. After 4 years, that resulted in the documentary Positive Chain of Change or my graduation project.

The documentary premiered on October 6, 2018, during the Dutch Sustainable Fashion week. The reactions were fantastic and I can’t wait to share this with the rest of the world and with the whole of the Netherlands (tip: hopefully early next year on NPO3). How can we solve the clothing problem? The problem is super complex, but the biggest problem is that we are shifting responsibility to someone else. The government, the market (companies/brands) and the consumer are the main players and actually point to each other. But if you point a finger at another, you point a finger at yourself. You as a consumer, yourself working for a (fashion) company, yourself working for the government. We must realize that we are connected to each other. We are all links in the chain, where cooperation can bring a positive chain reaction. It sounds logical, but unfortunately, it is not all that easy. I wanted to approach the documentary positively, emphasize positive examples in the market. People who want to make a change themselves, instead of waiting for it, and I went looking for all those people. Many of these people have quit their jobs to make this change. Just like at Hatsup  (during this interview Hatsup launches its brand in the Impact store).

Chanel en Rachel Hatsup The Impact Shop

Hatsup makes sustainable products and ensures that someone with a mental illness is helped with every purchase.

Why did you start The Impact Shop in Amsterdam?

The impact shop is an initiative of Liza Elsenburg, known among others for the Gelukszoekers. She did not want to do this on her own and via me, she ended up here. I had been in the sustainable fashion industry for a few years, I knew the players and I already worked with many brands with my own company Mumster.

.

The Impact Shop Chanel Trapman

I could offer a lot to companies, but it was just that last piece, the sale, that is ultimately what it’s all about, that I couldn’t offer them. By working together with Liza the puzzle was complete. The name, “The Impact Shop” actually says enough. It fits me really well.

Which clothing brands are sold in The Impact Shop?

The great thing about The Impact Shop is that research has been done into the brands that are being offered. Sustainable production, transparency in the chain, the materials used and working conditions are looked at. One brand is more sustainable than the other brand. Rhumaa is a brand that communicates very clearly that it is not yet 100% organic matter, but that they have consciously opted for a certain mix in order to make the product-life longer. Then it is also more sustainable and better for the environment. The Dutch bag brand Fraenck makes an impact on all areas, they are a lot further in the process.

Do you have some tips for more sustainable shopping?

  • Buy less (that is very strange to say with my shop, it is true)

  • Buy second hand: The Next Closet or Lena Library!

  • Find your personal style. That way you limit faulty-buying.

  • Buy products of better sustainable quality. This makes clothes last longer and you will not have to buy something new as quickly.

  • Do not throw away clothing immediately if it is broken, but have it repaired. Don’t like your clothes anymore? Give it a second life, bring your clothes to someone else or throw it in a textile bin.

  • Best tip; buy at The Impact Shop in Amsterdam!

Do you find yourself a world improver?

Oehhh, (short break, but full) YES! If you take it very literally, I am a world improver. Everything I do is all about improving the world. Sustainable fashion is of course about people and the environment, animal and welfare, everything – the world. But I also want to bring improvement to the next generation that comes into this world. We all live in the world and everything I do is about improving it.

When are you most happy?

I really get very happy when I notice that more and more people are becoming more aware of sustainability, the environment etc. It is good to hear that more people are starting to think about who they are and how they can contribute to improving the world in a positive way. But luckily I still get from my son, friends, and family. Ordinary life actually.

Do you want to know more about sustainable fashion, the petition or the documentary, do you have questions for Chanel or do you want to say something to her? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or via Facebook or Instagram


Polluted river China by Fashion Industry

Fashion Fix Above Everything? Tips for a sustainable lifestyle

In recent years we have been bombarded with the word sustainability. Sustainable food, sustainable clothing, sustainable fairs, sustainable care, sustainable sports, sustainable work, and sustainable living. But what is it anyway?

We are the first generation to experience the impact of climate change, but also the last generation that can do something about it.

As it is now, we, as consumers, have to get to work

As it is, we, as consumers, have to get to work and think with each issue: “put your money where your mouth is”. If you are aware, there will naturally change. I personally experienced it a few months ago. I came to a halt from my busy and always hurried life.

Sustainable lifestyle life and family Rachel Cannegieter

Before I became aware of everything, I wanted to make a career, raise two sweet children, and I had an enormous drive to get up that ladder as much as possible.

Which ladder am I actually trying to climb and at what price is that really?

In my world, the fashion industry, it seems as if I’m struggling hard every time and then asking myself; where and for whom do I actually do this? It’s this undefined love/hate relationship with Fashion, I assume. Unfortunately, I rang the bell too late and I ended up in a sort of burnout status. In my stressed status, I thought about life. Am I still happy with my job, am I on the right track? Who was I again? And what do I actually want to give my children? If they see me go to work so unhappy, they never get my work ethos along. Is that the example I want to leave behind? And of course, there is also the complete exploitation in my fashion industry. What do I want to give to the next generations?

The textile industry is a very polluting industry

Rana Plaza, that disaster in Bangladesh in 2013, in which more than 1100 women and their children died, because the building did not meet the requirements for textile production. Do you remember that? Did you know that there is still slavery in the clothing industry and that people have to work extremely long days, sometimes 24/7, days and weeks in a row for our must-have outfit or Fashion Fix? The textile industry is a very polluting industry. 10% of CO2 emissions come from textiles. For comparison: 2.5% CO2 emissions come from the aviation industry. We then use around 10,000 liters of water per outfit (jeans + shirt) to produce it. In addition, I have not even talked about all the chemicals and dyes to make our jeans so special. These are namely dumped in nearby rivers. This way, the entire community can see which trendy color is “in fashion” in the West.

Polluted river China by Fashion Industry

The above is just the tip of the iceberg. But of course, you can now ask yourself why we still produce nature polluting and why the working conditions in the factories are so bad?

If we continue with our consumption this way there will be more plastic than fish in our oceans by 2050

This is such a typical case of the “pointing finger”. The fashion brands blame the consumer, the government blames the companies and the consumer blames the government. My father always said if you point a finger at the other, three points at yourself. So time to get started. If we continue to use our consumption in this way, there will be more plastic in 2050 than fish in our oceans (by weight).

Tips for a greener and more sustainable existence:

·         Pay and save greener: investing, saving but also daily banking can be done at greener banks/investment companies (eg Triodos)

·         Vote for green: use your voting rights and vote for people in politics who speak about climate change.

·         Buy plants: it absorbs CO2 and you get more balanced + you become more energetic with the color green.

·         Reduce your own CO2 footprint: buy solar panels, take a bicycle, take the bus, go carpooling with your colleague or opt for an electric car. But also separate your waste, do your shopping with cotton bags (also for fruit/vegetables), become vegetarian or eat less meat.

In the meantime, I have also started to live greener and more sustainably. I have introduced five different waste bins. That seems extreme (if you come from one or two), but trust me, it is not so bad once you do it (and you’re surprised by the number of single-use plastics).

Then I went to clean up waste after a wonderful day at the beach. A real hashtag has been created for this on Instagram: # 5minutesbeachcleanup. After the beach season

I thought; hey we have to do this in our neighborhood. You know; create awareness of roaming plastic. So we did just that. Because of this you are not only enjoying the walk, but you are also doing something good for fellow human beings and nature. Below a photo of the garbage disposal in our neighborhood. It was a fantastic evening.

Neighborhood clean up together we make a better world

Honest? I’m not there yet. I am still on my way and I would like to take you on a journey in my “greener” and more sustainable life without this having a goat wool socks image. In the end, I am still the fashionista who loves fashion. Sustainable fashion.

Do you want to know more about a sustainable existence or do you have questions for us? Feel free to do that in the comments below. Do you see mistakes? Let us know! Do you want to stay informed? Sign up for our Newsletter or via Facebook and Instagram.